Meditations: Session Four – On Fear

Edit / Update {9/28/2014}

I’ve since some to the realization that fear is not tempered by courage, but by faith, and I’m coming to understand that spirituality is the backbone for creating the confident self-talk that will allow you to overcome fear.

Also, my discovery and journey into Outwitting The Devil, the following quote, which supports this hypothesis has really resonated with me:

“You are entitled to know that two entities occupy your body. One of these entities is motivated by and responds to the impulse of fear. The other is motivated by and responds to the impulse of faith. Will you be guided by faith or will you allow fear to overtake you?”
― Napoleon Hill, Outwitting the Devil, 1928

A couple quotes I have been enjoying lately that support this are:

“You’re either living your dreams [faith] or you’re living your fears” – Les Brown

“Believe in yourself, but trust in G-d” – Jewish Proverb

 

/edit

Last night I dove back into my meditations, using the method I detailed here.

The fact that I haven’t been setting aside time for my meditation practice is partly a result of a lack of discipline in this area of my life, but it’s also a reflection of the massive power of my previous meditations. Their meaning has continued to become increasingly valued to me each time I’ve revisited them during a period of introspection and reflection.

Unfortunately, last night I made the mistake of going directly into action post meditation rather than taking the time to write down and capture my realizations. Simple excitement, but next time I will be sure to savor the process of outputting my energy, rather than simply running off with that high.

I wrote down a few notes over coffee this morning, and the rest below is coming from memory, so again – the importance of writing after meditation cannot be understated, particularly given the method I use for my meditations.

Boiling Down Fear

  • Fear often boils down to the belief that we aren’t greater than our present circumstance and as a result we fear that we won’t overcome it
  • Any belief about insufficiency is a product of insecurity
  • Insecurity is the reptilian, lower level part of our psyche that is responsible for fear
  • When we are living from fear, we are living from a lower level of consciousness, because there is a more rational and grounded voice within us that knows BETTER
  • Fear occurs when past expectations and outcomes are allowed to negatively change our perception of the future.

overcoming rising above Fear: Establishing and maintaining state

  • Since we know there in an inner voice within us that knows without a doubt we can accomplish and attain what we desire (This is the same inner-voice that becomes frustrated with our fears standing in our way and with our situation) – then we must establish this inner voice as our dominant voice.
  • Establishing our inner-voice as the dominant voice responsible for our self-talk enables us to maintain a chosen mindset that’s responsible for guiding our life and holding us accountable to a higher standard than the negative fear driven lower level consciousness.
  • It’s about establishing and maintaining state to raise your frequency to a level that’s equivalent to the worth of your desires.
  • The key to establishing state is introspection, reflection, and meditation – rituals that connect ourselves to our inner voice.
  • Self talk is the key to maintaining state – you have to hold your frame, by holding your thoughts inner voice accountable – it has to be congruent.
  • When we establish the right mindset (inner voice dominant self-talk) and hold the right state, we are effecting change the proper way – from within. We are also committing to perceiving the future from a place of empowerment and confidence.

###

PostScript – Here are a couple relevant videos I am enjoying that relate to fear and self-talk:

Best part of this video starts at 5:35.

Interesting mindgame to shift inner perspective, i.e., the hero of the movie mindset, and imagining the documentary crew following. I think the other interesting and valuable points are the idea of tough (self) love and being able to take an honest look at your life.

One caveat I want to put forth is that I don’t think it requires ‘positive thinking’ or changing your mindset so much as fortifying yourself from lower level consciousness and fear consciousness by establishing and maintaining a chosen mindset that reflects your inner voice / so it’s almost a major shift, versus a thought by thought change.

Really glad I took the time to meditate last night. It’s nice to burn a candle, light some incense, and just do something completely alone for myself that enables such a healthy and positive state of mind. As an added bonus, I was doing sprints and crunches on the sand before sunrise and made a point to dive into the pitch black ocean simply because I didn’t feel like being afraid to do it.

p.s. Doing some more research on the brain in regards to fear and came across the following two videos, which helped me better understand how my physical brain operates in relation to fear and change.

Great info that reinforces the concept of the reptilian brain in regards to fear.

This from 10:18 on contains some extremely valuable / insightful content. Some really awesome stuff on the way we can use self-talk and thought management to effect change.

Also this clip frames fear in a very rational and grounded way:

And this from 38 min onward reinforces the the power of passion and goals over fear.

And as an interim conclusion on my meditations and thoughts on fear, I really feel like one of the major pillars of rising above fear is stoicism. Adopting a dominant inner-voice that’s rooted in a more rational, higher level of consciousness is inherently stoic because it’s the antithesis of our emotionally driven, and reactive reptilian brain.

I’ve long read Marcus Aurelius’ Meditations, and think that the stoics had a wonderful grounding in reality due to their ability to master their emotions and put aside fear.

I just finished watching a talk on what Ryan Holliday calls “Stoic Optimism” and it provides some good examples of individuals who have overcome fear and the obstacles they have faced to ultimately become who they were capable of becoming. So, ultimately, fear is often our reaction to the obstacle standing between us and our potential. Being stoic allows us to rise up to meet fear with excellence, fortitude, and will, rather than cowering in meek defeat.

“The impediment to action becomes the action, what stands in the way becomes the way” – Marcus Aurelius

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One thought on “Meditations: Session Four – On Fear

  1. Pingback: Journey to Self‑Mastery: Self‑Control and Self‑Discipline | 7saturdays

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